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3 February 2006
Germany : Government wants to raise retirement age to 67 years old by 2029
The parties ivolved in Angela Merkel’s big coalition government have decided to raise the retirement age to 67 years old (from 65 today) in 2029 instead of 2024. This has been anounced Wednesday February 1st, after the council of ministers, by the Vice Chancellor and minister for Work Franz Münterfering (SPD). (Ref. 0696)
3 February 2006
Spain : the main social tasks of the Zapatero government for 2006
Often criticized because it is the worse country in terms of womens’emplyment rate (around 48%), Spain has made gender equality one of its priorities for 2006. The government has also decided to fight the job market’s segmentation -the rate of precarious jobs is close to 35% compared to 13% on average in the EU- by reconsidering all types of job contracts. (Réf. 0695)
2 February 2006
Finland : a work group composed of social partners wants more stocks in pension funds
The Finnish pensions system is composed of two sub-systems: the first one is linked to work income, is mainly financed by employers and employees, and is managed by private insurance companies registered by the government. The second system is national public insurance, its aim is to guarantee a minimal pension to every retiree. It is financed by taxes and the Finnish social security (KELA).(Réf. 0692)
2 February 2006
Great Britain: 27 bills related to employment are on the Parliament’s agenda.
Curenntly, 27 bills that are somewhat related to the employment legislation are somewhere in the British Parliament. Some of them have already passed the third reading, whereas others are just drafts. The bills which will get the royal seal in time, according to the procedure, will take effect on April 6. Indeed, since 2004, laws related to employment are promulgated twice a year: on April 6, which is the beginning of the fiscal year, and on October 1st, when the minimum wage is increased. (Réf. 0691)
1 February 2006
France: a recommandation reminds the rules on State aid to companies
A memo of January 26, 2006 relating to the application in France of Community rules on competition, involving government aid to companies (OJ n° 26 of January 31, 2006, p. 1602) reminds local authorities of the implications for France of the European regulations on State aid. (Ref. 0685)
1 February 2006
Labour market reforms are too slow, says the Commission
On January 25th, the European Commission published its annual report on growth and jobs. By this means, which is part of the re-launching of the Lisbon Strategy, it expects Member States to drive their reforms better . This new processus aims at getting the governments to commit themselves to implementing concrete measures. It gives us the opportunity to have an overview on what the trends and directions of the reforms are in the 25 Member States. (Ref. 0688)
1 February 2006
Netherlands : it will be easier to fire an employee
On January 25th, four multinational companies; Philips, Shell, Unilever and Azko Nobel have once again backed the draft law -currently in Parliament- which aims at “flexibilising” layoffs and dismissals, in order to facilitate hiring. As usual, a reform involving flexisecurity leads to a reform of unemployment insurance. (Ref. 0684)
1 February 2006
Germany : new rules for unemployment benefits
Starting February 1st 2006, new rules apply to the jobseeker’s allowance called “Arbeitslosengeld 1”. The changes enacted by the January 1st, 2004 legislation involve the length and conditions of payment of this allowance. (Ref. 0687)